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Its Texas Time: Iconic Artistry

Its Texas Time: Iconic Artistry

This week, we learned a bit about Charles Franklin “Frank” Reaugh (pronounced ray), the cat outside our marketing office and also the Texan artist known for immortalizing the imagery of Texan cattle. Born in Jacksonville, Illinois in December of 1860, Frank Reaugh moved to Terrell, a town near Dallas, Texas at the age of 15....

November 19, 2021November 19, 2021
It’s Texas Time: Schisms and Schemes

It’s Texas Time: Schisms and Schemes

If you saw the episode this week you know we discussed how Texas played a major role in the Civil War. 60,000 to 70,000 Texans served in either state or Confederate units, of which 20-25% lost their lives in the process. More than half of these deaths were caused by diseases contracted while living in...

November 5, 2021November 3, 2021
Cisneros | Chapter 1: An Introduction

Cisneros | Chapter 1: An Introduction

José Cisneros was born in Villa Ocampo, Mexico in 1910. The Cisneros family home was situated on a twenty-seven-acre plot located just outside of the village. In addition to carpenter work, José’s father, Don Fernando Cisneros, also operated a barber shop and blacksmith business out of the family home. As political unrest cast a veil...

October 29, 2021November 4, 2021
It’s Texas Time: Honing Your Craft

It’s Texas Time: Honing Your Craft

This week we talked about the iconic Stelzig saddle company. Here’s a brief rundown: Austrian immigrant Antone Stelzig and his wife Theresa arrived in Galveston in 1843, quickly setting up a system where the couple – 19 and 16 respectively – would travel by ox-drawn cart from ranch to ranch offering on-site leather work.   Now,...

October 22, 2021October 11, 2021
It’s Texas Time: Yeehaw!

It’s Texas Time: Yeehaw!

This week we talked about the history of the cattle drive. Cattle drives were common in the late 1800s, when cowboys would herd their cattle west, to places like Abilene, Kansas (a major hub), Wyoming, New Mexico, Colorado, or even Montana. From these Midwestern cities, the cattle would be shipped off to the Northeast and...

October 8, 2021October 7, 2021
The Shape of Texas

The Shape of Texas

The Republic of Texas was an independent nation, bordering the United States and Mexico, that existed from April 21, 1836, to February 19, 1846. The new Republic was formed by the defeat of Mexico in the Texas Revolution and claimed borders that encompassed an area that included the present State of Texas, as well as parts...

September 29, 2021September 24, 2021
It’s Texas Time: A Tale of One City

It’s Texas Time: A Tale of One City

Here’s a lovely poem from our second week of Summer Camp at The Bryan Museum about the main character of today’s blog post. It’s an ‘I Am’ poem, a form which the campers were taught in one of several writing lessons.   I am brave and adventurous.​I wonder if the New World will ever be conquered.  I...

September 24, 2021September 24, 2021
It’s Texas Time: Living on a Prayer

It’s Texas Time: Living on a Prayer

This week we spoke about the huge mission bell in the Spanish Colonial Gallery and its significance in the mission system which spanned across the Southwestern United States.  Mission bells were cast in two bronze parts – the ‘core’ inner mold and the ‘cope’ outer mold. The method of production led to each bell having...

September 10, 2021September 8, 2021
Family Treasures

Family Treasures

This dictionary was the property of and used by Stephen F. Austin …(illegible)  his sister Emily, has been willed to and used by Guy M. Bryan. – Signed: S. F. Austin. This inscription, inside an 1828 dictionary belonging to Stephen F. Austin, will soon be on display as part of the Texas Frontier Exhibit, along...

September 2, 2021August 24, 2021
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